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Event
  • 06.05.2022

Exchanging Best Practices and Support to Teachers in EiE Situations

Please register here.

This webinar is part of the INEE Meet-Ups, which are informal gatherings in all corners of the globe where INEE members and others can network, share experiences, and discuss relevant topics. This topical meets-up will discuss best practices and support for teachers in emergencies situation.

Join us on 19 May at 17.00 UTC time.

For more information, please visit the INEE website or contact meetups@inee.org.

News
  • 24.03.2022

Supporting teachers in emergencies through crisis-sensitive policies

By Karen Mundy, Director of UNESCO’s International Institute for Educational Planning and Carlos Vargas-Tamez, Head of the Secretariat of the International Task Force on Teachers for Education 2030 and Chief of Section for Teacher Development, UNESCO

The unfolding events in Ukraine are a stark reminder that crises can strike anytime, anywhere. In addition, other ongoing crises such as COVID-19, various conflicts and disasters across the globe, including those due to climate change, are all threatening education continuity and quality – especially for those displaced. In 2021, the UN Refugee Agency reported that more than 84 million people were forcibly displaced globally. In 2022, this figure is set to rise, as more than 1.5 million children have already fled Ukraine.

 

Are education systems ready to respond?

Education systems are often underprepared in the face of crises – whether in terms of welcoming the sudden arrival of refugee children, protecting the safety of learners and teachers, or having to quickly shift to remote learning. In many countries, plans to prepare for, respond to, and recover from crises are lacking, which makes already chaotic situations more complicated and leaves frontline actors with limited guidance and tools to respond effectively.

Schools and their communities are too often the direct target of attacks. Between 2015 and 2019, more than 8,000 students, teachers, and other school personnel in 37 conflict-affected countries were killed, injured, abducted, threatened, arrested, or detained, according to the Global Coalition to Protect Education from Attack. Various reports point to schools being attacked in Ukraine.

As illustrated by COVID-19, teachers – who are themselves affected by crisis – often act as critical agents of support to colleagues and students alike. They can foster a sense of safety and normalcy, while supporting families and communities with important information. Their support to learners is essential – but teachers can only tap into this role if their needs are first addressed.  

For example, teachers need to be equipped to teach in increasingly challenging conditions, such as damaged facilities or overcrowded classrooms, and to be able to differentiate pedagogy to adapt to learners from education systems that use other curricula and languages. Since teachers are impacted by crises in various ways, they also need to receive adequate psychosocial, material, and financial support to play the supportive role that learners need. 

 

Supporting education systems to build crisis-sensitive teacher policies

Applying an emergency and crisis-sensitive lens in the development and implementation of national teacher policies is essential to ensure that teachers can act as critical agents of support and protection to ensure that quality, inclusive education continues and to promote social cohesion and resilience. This involves anticipating and addressing challenges of recruitment, deployment, retention, and training, while also ensuring teacher well-being, job security, and safe and enabling working conditions.

In 2021, the conveners of the Norwegian Teacher Initiative joined forces with the Teacher Task Force and UNESCO’s International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) to develop a new module to inform the development and implementation of emergency and crisis-sensitive national teacher policies, in recognition of the important role played by teachers in preparing for and responding to crisis and emergency situations.

This new module complements the 2019 Teacher Policy Development Guide (TPDG). It highlights the importance of crisis-sensitive teacher policies to increase the resilience of education systems by ensuring that education stakeholders are able to prepare for and respond to crises. It addresses the various dimensions of teacher policy and puts forward new measures to support teachers as they work to prevent, mitigate, and recover from conflicts and disasters. The module also includes country examples, highlighting effective policies and practices for teacher management in crisis settings.

Teacher policies that consider the implications of crisis on the profession can contribute to a motivated, quality workforce. Such policies are key to ensure that teachers are not just supported and protected but are also prepared to provide vulnerable children with safe learning spaces and quality education, and thus protecting this fundamental right for all.

The new module on Crisis-sensitive teacher policy develop is available for download on the Teacher Task Force’s website.

 

About the TPDG

The Teacher Policy Development Guide was designed as a dynamic tool to address emerging teacher policy challenges. It is built on the premise that a holistic teacher policy is needed to improve the quantity and quality of teachers. To be effective in enabling inclusive, quality education, teacher policies must be comprehensive and integrate different interrelated aspects of the profession, such as, recruitment and retention, teacher education, deployment, career structure, teachers’ working conditions, rewards and remuneration, standards, accountability, and school governance. In addition, teacher policies need to be well planned, resourced and aligned with other educational and non-educational policies to ensure effective implementation.

 

Photo credit: Sacha Myers, Save the Children

Event
  • 01.04.2022

School Leadership & Governance in Crisis Contexts - sharing good practice, lessons learned and opportunities for change

Please register here

INEE’s Teachers in Crisis Contexts (TiCC) Collaborative, in partnership with the LEGO FoundationEducation InternationalOxfamUNESCO, and the International Task Force on Teachers for Education 2030, have come together to support a Call to Action to transform sector-wide support to teachers in crisis contexts.

Part of this work is to share examples of promising approaches and persistent challenges across policy, practice, and research related to four thematic areas: teacher well-being, teacher management, teacher professional development, and school leadership and governance

This webinar is the fourth and final in a series to contribute to a growing evidence base on how to improve the ways that we support teachers through prioritizing school leadership policies and practices (i.e., school leader professional development and support, community governance models, preparedness and recovery planning, etc.). School leaders are a vital part of the school ecology. They are key to providing quality, equitable education and improving the school climate for all teachers and students so children and youth are better able to learn. . As our colleague Yel Luka, a deputy head teacher in Kakuma refugee camp, explained, “I find immense meaning in my work... however I find my role to be demanding with little financial incentive which can leave me exhausted and unmotivated.”

Through a moderated discussion, school leaders and Education in Emergencies actors working across contexts such as Colombia, Kenya, and Tanzania will share share good practice, lessons learned, and opportunities for change to improve leadership and governance of teachers doing extraordinary work amidst extraordinarily challenging settings. 

Panelists: 

  • Christina Raphael - Senior Lecturer in Educational Leadership, Management and Policy studies, Deputy Principal - Academic Research and Consultancy: Dar es Salaam University College of Education (DUCE), Tanzania 
  • Sandra Barreto and Nicole Bruskewitz  - COO and CPO, CoSchool, Colombia
  • Stuart McAlpine - Team Lead, LEGO Playful Schools initiative

Moderators and Presenters: 

  • Andrew Armstrong - INEE
  • Charlotte Berquin - UNHCR
  • Chris Henderson - Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Mary Mendenhall -  Teachers College, Columbia University 

N.B. This web event will be conducted in English with closed captioning in English.

If you have any questions about the web event, contact: eventseries@inee.org 

Event
  • 21.01.2022

Teacher Management in Crisis Contexts: Sharing good practice, lessons learned and opportunities for change

INEE’s Teachers in Crisis Contexts (TiCC) Collaborative, in partnership with the LEGO FoundationEducation InternationalOxfamUNESCO, and the International Task Force on Teachers for Education 2030, have come together to support a Call to Action to transform sector-wide support to teachers in crisis contexts.

Part of this work is to share examples of promising approaches and persistent challenges across policy, practice, and research related to four thematic areas: teacher well-being, teacher management, teacher professional development, and school leadership and governance.

To register, click the link below:
https://rescue.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Cq_2KwxhRuuPAqI8eWsOxw

(After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the web event.)

N.B. This web event will be conducted in English with closed captioning in English.

This webinar is the third in a series to contribute to a growing evidence base on how to improve the ways that we support teachers through prioritizing teacher management policies and practices (i.e., recruitment, deployment, compensation, etc.). Teacher management is key to providing quality, equitable education and improving the classroom climate for all students so children and youth are better able to learn. As our colleague Francis, a Ugandan teacher explained, “I would like to see the teachers’ working conditions improve soon. Right now there are too few teachers for the many pupils. We lack teaching resources and proper working conditions.”

In this webinar, teachers and Education in Emergencies actors working in Myanmar, East Africa, and the Middle East will share their reflections on the challenges and opportunities of teacher management policies and practices in crisis contexts. Through a moderated discussion, these actors will come together to share good practice, lessons learned, and opportunities for change to improve teacher management for teachers doing extraordinary work amidst extraordinarily challenging settings. 

If you have any questions about the web event, contact: eventseries@inee.org.

Blog
  • 27.09.2021

Developing crisis-sensitive teacher policy: Webinar and international consultation

In the face of increasing global disruptions and crises, ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education for all by 2030 (SDG 4) will not be possible unless education planning is crisis-sensitive. Teachers, who are the most important in-school factor influencing student achievement, are often at the frontline in situations of crisis. For this reason, it is imperative to prioritize, support and protect teachers through adequate education policy and planning.

Building on the Guidance Note on Developing a Crisis-Sensitive Teacher Policy, jointly developed by UNESCO, UNHCR, ILO, and UNICEF in 2020 under the Norwegian Teacher Initiative (NTI), the webinar on Crisis-Sensitive Teacher Policy and Planning in Emergency and Displacement Situations on 16 September brought together policy experts, country representatives and teachers to shed a light on what is needed to ensure that teacher policy is crisis-sensitive.

In a discussion that touched upon the key policy areas of the guide, participants shared lessons learned during previous and ongoing crises, expanded on the role of teachers in emergency and displacement contexts and advocated for increased support for teachers in such contexts.

Displacement creates challenges for teacher recruitment, training and deployment  

If Covid-19 highlighted at a global level the hardships educators confront when schooling is disrupted, this pandemic is only one among many situations of crisis that challenge the continuity and quality of education worldwide. According to UNHCR (2021), at the end of 2020, 82.4 million people were forcibly displaced due to violent conflict, persecution and natural disasters.

Uganda, which has experienced several displacement crises, is currently one of the largest refugee-hosting countries in Africa. It hosts over 1.4 million refugees, making up 3.6 % of the country's total population. During the webinar, Ms. Constance Alezuyo, Coordinator of the National Education Response Plan for Refugees and Host Communities, explained that one of the biggest challenges her country faced in providing quality education for refugee children and youth has been recruiting teachers to live and work in the remote places where refugees are located. Furthermore, even when qualified teachers willing to relocate are found, it is difficult to provide them with adequate housing.

Ms. Angéline Neya Donbwa, Technical Secretary for Education in Emergencies in Burkina Faso, echoed Ms. Alezuyo’s assessment. She added that with over of 1.4 million internally displaced persons and 2,444 schools closed in her country, redeployment of teachers from conflict-ridden areas to overcrowded host villages in safer zones has been a major challenge. Grace*, an internally displaced teacher also from Burkina Faso, expanded on the challenges of teaching children who have been traumatized. She explained that some of her students had trouble concentrating in class, were afraid or reacted in aggressive or violent ways. She also noted that in her classroom she had to address the needs of internally displaced children as well as be responsive to the needs of the children of the host community.

Psychosocial and financial support are essential for both students and teachers

Psychosocial support stands out as an important dimension of crisis-sensitive planning. Ms. Neya Donbwa explained that the need for this type of support has clearly been expressed by communities affected by insecurity and violence in her country. In addition to needing support to cope with traumatic situations themselves, teachers need to be able to deal with the physical and emotional impact of the crisis on their students. This has led Ms. Neya Donbwa’s team to develop a module for dealing with traumatic situations to supplement their “Safe School” trainings designed to prepare teachers for crisis situations.   

Moreover, teachers’ financial stability is often impacted during crisis and emergency situations. Ms. Neya Donbwa explained that continuing to pay teachers’ salaries when they had to flee unsafe areas is one of the provisions in their crisis teacher management strategy. Similarly, Ms. Alezuyo explained that during times of crisis in Uganda, government school teachers kept receiving their salaries until they were redeployed. However, this was not the case for private school teachers during the Covid-19 crisis, as Ms. Stella Turehe, a teacher from Uganda explained. Ms. Turehe shared that the financial pressures private schools faced during this crisis led to many school closures and teachers losing their jobs.

Complying with sanitary measures demands flexibility and innovation

Complying with Covid-19 sanitary measures was also difficult for schools and at times, led to their complete closure. In Uganda, the measures issued by the Ministry of Health capped student-teacher ratios at 20 students per teacher. According to Ms. Turehe, refugee settlement schools - which have high enrolment numbers – have struggled to reopen. However, in response to this, teachers have initiated a number of actions with the support of NGOs, such as devising a double shift system to allow schools to re-open, and promoting e-learning through tablets and group-learning in refugee students’ communities.

Moreover, teachers also innovated to support the whole school community during the COVID-19 crisis in Uganda. This involved organizing back-to-school campaigns, setting up committees to connect with learners and parents, forming student clubs, and offering guidance to teens.

The importance of communication and consultation mechanisms

Teacher communication and feedback mechanisms are essential to ensuring that policy-makers are adequately informed about the rapidly changing conditions that characterize crisis situations. Ms. Alezuyo explained that there are different levels of communication between policy-makers, teachers and communities in Uganda and how they are adapted to crisis-sensitive education planning. The teacher management information system tracks teachers’ levels of training and experience which facilitates teacher deployment and efficient planning during crises. Communication at school and community level has adapted, including through mobile phones, radios and social media platforms.

Consultation for new module on Crisis-Sensitive Teacher Policy

The webinar also launched an international consultation to develop a new module on Crisis-Sensitive Teacher Policy and Planning which will complement the Teacher Policy Development Guide developed by the International Task Force on Teachers for Education 2030The module has been developed with the UNESCO International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP).

The draft module is available for comments and suggested case studies at the link below:

English: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1NC8h2fNfjYj3CxSI2jkQWOYjy2v5Zz1N/edit

French: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1E6WlaCuoeDGyi6WHTZPaUUAcHntbB97t/edit?rtpof=true&sd=true

Please submit your comments and suggestions by 1 October to sm.richter@unesco.org.


*Name has been changed for security reasons 

Photo credit: UNHCR/Eduardo Soteras